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New York Giants Have Approximately $2,656,846 in Cap Space

August 5th, 2013 at 12:30 PM
By Dan Benton

For all of the capologists out there, the latest salary cap numbers are in for all 32 NFL teams and the New York Giants remain near the bottom of the league (27th overall) with only $2,656,846 in salary cap space remaining.

'Steve Weatherford of the New York Giants' photo (c) 2012, Marianne O'Leary - license: http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/2.0/

With all rookies now under contract, that may seem like an irrelevant fact, but that couldn't be further from the truth.

The Top 51 Rule will end on September 5th (official start of the regular season) and all teams will be required to add on the additional salaries of players No. 52 and No. 53, as well as all players designated to Injured Reserve (IR), the Physically Unable to Perform (PUP) list and any players with whom they reached an injury settlement (for the Giants, that would be Antonio Dennard and, most likely, Jeremy Horne). They will also be required to add on any additional dead money from players cut during training camp.

As New York Giants Salary Cap Central points out, this may (see: likely) lead to the Giants restructuring some deals, and one that stands out is punter Steve Weatherford.

The Giants may look to make more room themselves by possibly restructuring the contract of Steve Weatherford, which I had speculated about before on this blog. If they were to do so, then they could create an added $738,750 worth of extra cap space to add on to their figure of $2,656,846 that they currently have. That would in turn increase the Giants' overall cap space, making them $3,395,506 under the cap.

And, hey … Weatherford did say he would play for free

Note: The NFLPA has the Giants listed with a cap space of $2,251,846, but here is why that's not correct.

Also…

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Tags: Antonio Dennard, Football, Jeremy Horne, New York, New York Giants, NFL, Steve Weatherford

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8 Responses to “New York Giants Have Approximately $2,656,846 in Cap Space”

  1.  Krow says:

    Interesting article …

    2010-2012 NFL Drafts: Team-By-Team Draft Success In First Three Rounds

    http://www.bloggingtheboys.com/2013/3/18/4098882/2010-2012-nfl-drafts-team-by-team-draft-success-in-first-three-rounds

    •  GOAT56 says:

      This is interesting. I think looking at just a 3 year view is too small. I say that because in some cases teams have voids that make it so a player is needed to start. Look at the list and as many more teams rate highly as good teams. And the bottom 5 includes arguably 4 of the top 6 franchises the past 5-6 years. A good team shouldn’t need rookies to start, even highly drafted ones. Many get on TC for not playing rookies but look our company.

      A player like Randle would start this year but because we found Cruz he’s not. Also that’s the case with Jernigan. Jernigan was drafted to be Smith’s replacement at slot WR but Cruz emerged a never gave Jernigan a chance. Take Dallas, Murray is starting because of the failed pick of Felix Jones. Carter might be starting because of the failed pick of Bobby Carpenter. I think the Cowboys have continued to gather stars but their issues is that they don’t draft well later in the draft or acquire quality backup talent. One of the reasons I think Dallas is just a 500% team is their DL which starting wise is very good. But depth wise is very poor. It’s the same at many other positions with Dallas. The reason why people like myself applaud JR isn’t his 2nd and 3rd round picks which have been average. It’s that he’s great in the first, good in the later parts of the draft and great with UDFA. And that doesn’t include the Stevie Browns and Will Hill type additions.

  2.  Krow says:

    Cap space is like having a full tank of gas and assuming that once the needle hits empty then your car is finished.

  3.  GOAT56 says:

    Maybe I’m missing something but I don’t see why 2.66 mil in cap space isn’t enough. Now the top 51 only count but it’s the top 51 so the contracts below that are all minimum type contracts. All of our current PUP places are part of the top 51. Given that most minimum contracts aren’t guaranteed it seems that 2.66 mil should be enough.

  4.  GOAT56 says:

    Demo – that was a good write up from SI. Normally, the national writers are way off but this almost seemed like they spoke to a beat writer because the made many good points. I think the point that we don’t talk about as much is that our much complained about zone defenses take a lot of communication. Which means having players that have been in the system is a big help. I think it signals that Herzlich has a real edge on Conner due to knowing the defense and understanding the zones. It also explains why Ross can be very helpful as well as TT as players experienced in this defense.

    •  fanfor55years says:

      Familiarity with the system AND how your teammates will react to a particular situation is crucial in a cover zone. There are many multiple choices in that scheme, and it isn’t a lot less difficult than the route trees the receivers have to learn.

      But counting on Terrell Thomas to help in that regard is going way out on a limb. We can all hope he’ll do so, but that hope rides on a wing-and-a-prayer. I don’t see how we can count on him this season even if he looks right. His durability will ALWAYS be in question.

  5.  rlhjr says:

    Interesting……I’ve a feeling that most good GM know kids who can play.
    The issues are value and do you really want to take a chance on the kid.
    (See Hernandez)

    Other factors like can/will a kid physically grow into a position, and do you have time to wait for him. That’s where special teams value kick in. Cases in point;
    Adrian Tracy & Spencer Paysinger. To some they appear on the surface to be camp fodder or career ST players. Look closer and you’ll see they were projected to grow into the program.

    If you happened to have seen Tracy play in college you would understand.
    I suspect Paysinger’s MO was fast and smart.

  6.  kujo says:

    Tom Rock ?@TomRock_Newsday 3m
    Nicks: “I’m practicing tomorrow.”

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