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New York Giants 2013 Free Agent Profile: CB Chris Houston

March 1st, 2013 at 3:08 PM
By Paul Tierney

The New York Giants have to solve the Corey Webster situation before they make any moves at the cornerback position. The team can clear $9 million of salary cap space if they release Webster, but it still remains to be seen if he is willing to stick around at a substantially reduced price tag. Regardless, with uncertainty surrounding both Webster's performance and the health of Terrell Thomas, the Giants need a cornerback to add depth next season. Detroit Lions free-agent cornerback Chris Houston could make sense, as he's coming off the best season of his career in 2012.

The theme of the Giants offseason, just like any offseason, is going to be value. Historically, general manager Jerry Reese does not spend big on pricey, big name free-agents. Successful NFL teams build through the draft, and that's a philosophy the Giants have thrived under in recent years. However, with the glaring need the team has in the defensive backfield, it may not be prudent to wait on a rookie draft pick to develop into a contributor. Houston is not a lockdown cornerback or a player who is going to transform the Giants secondary into an intimidating unit. However, he presents great value on the free-agent market.

Houston is a well built, physical cornerback with good speed and reliable instincts. His veteran knowledge has given him an ability to jump routes and he's still physical enough to play in run support as well. Although recent seasons have not made the Lions  known for their stellar pass defense, Houston is a reliable perimeter defender that would provide competition at the starting cornerback spot alongside Prince Amukamara.

Although it's difficult to project how successful a defensive back will be after changing teams and defensive schemes, Houston reigns from a Lions defense that relies heavily on pass rusher to get to the quarterback. His speed would allow him to fit in well in Perry Fewell's defense, as he would be asked to do perform similarly to what he did last season, when he established himself as Detriot's best cover cornerback.

After making $3 million last season, Houston may be due a modest raise in 2013. Even so, he can still be signed at half the price the Giants are slated to pay Webster next year. Given that Houston undoubtedly outperformed Webster in 2012, the Giants may look to make a change in the defensive backfield next season. Given that Houston will not command a top-dollar contract and plays a reliable cornerback position, his value may be too much for the Giants to pass up on the 2013 free-agent market.

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Tags: Corey Webster, Detroit, Detroit Lions, Football, Houston, Jerry Reese, New York, New York Giants, NFL, Perry Fewell, Prince Amukamara, Terrell Thomas

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43 Responses to “New York Giants 2013 Free Agent Profile: CB Chris Houston”

  1.  GOAT56 says:

    Repost:

    Bucs could be interested in David Carr

    Despite the fact he hasn’t started a game since 2007, and has a career record of 23-56, there appears to be a market for Giants backup quarterback David Carr.

    No, really.

    According to Mike Garafolo of USA Today, the Buccaneers were interested in Carr a year ago, and “should be again.” The link is former Giants assistant Mike Sullivan, now the Bucs offensive coordinator.

    The Bucs might want someone to push Josh Freeman, but not to the extent they have to pay that person a load of money, and Carr could satisfy that requirement.

    Since taking a horrible beating as the first pick of the expansion Texans, Carr’s career has settled into a comfortable groove. He ended up playing more than he anticipated with the Panthers in 2007, and has since spent four years with the Giants and one with the 49ers without starting a game.

    He’s thrown 61 passes in the last five years, and even if he plays for the minimum, can bank another million bucks.

    Life is not always fair.

    http://profootballtalk.nbcsports.com/2013/03/01/bucs-could-be-interested-in-david-carr/

    •  G-MenFan says:

      Let me tell you something right now.

      The ****ing Bucs are interested in EVERY Giants player, coach, front office person, locker room attendants, you name it. It wouldn’t shock me if they started an ad campaign trying to get Giants fans to move to Florida and root for the Bucs.

      Since hiring Schiano, the Bucs have become the biggest Giants “wannabes” in the NFL.

  2.  shmitty013 says:

    Interesting article here from PFF on the value of players on the Giants. Basically saying what we know. They spend on D, but stink. And they don’t spend that much on O and are talented. Surprisingly, they list Rolle as extremely overpriced.

    In this series of pieces, Pro Football Focus is hammering into the value of players. To us it’s a “Performance Based Value” number, telling you what players were worth (by our grading) in 2012. You can read about the work we’ve done to create it here, but in short:

    • It’s solely about what a player did on the field in 2012
    • Players are grouped by positions so their play essentially earns them a portion of the positional salary pool
    • It’s all about cap hits (these values are approximate)

    Here are 2012?s most undervalued and overvalued New York Giants:

    (* Denotes player missed significant portion of time through injury)

    Undervalued

    1. William Beatty, Offensive Tackle

    It took a David Diehl injury for Beatty to crack the starting lineup in 2012, and luckily for the Giants it was a move that ended up helping the team. He allowed just three combined sacks/hits, which was second fewest for tackles with at least 200 pass-block snaps. His +10.9 run block rating was third-best among left tackles, which made him a double threat at the position. The Giants did a great job locking up Beatty for the long term just two days ago.

    2012 Cap Hit: $850k
    2012 Performance Based Value: $8.0m
    Value Differential: +$7.2m

    2. Jason Pierre-Paul, Defensive End

    Some might thing Pierre-Paul had a down year because his sack total was cut in half, but really JPP was still a great player. His dominance comes more in the run game where his Run Stop Percentage of 9.0 was second among 4-3 defensive ends. He had 55 total pressures, which was 15th-most, and still leaves him as a very good edge rusher — which is a position which typically makes a lot of money.

    2012 Cap Hit: $2.5m
    2012 Performance Based Value: $7.6m
    Value Differential: +$5.1m

    3. Linval Joseph, Defensive Tackle

    Linval Joseph is yet another very young Giants player that is playing much better than his rookie contract is worth. His 6.9 Run Stop Percentage and 6.3 Pass Rushing Productivity are both better than average at the position. He still has a ways to go to be among the very best at the position, but he has made a good start.

    2012 Cap Hit: $930k
    2012 Performance Based Value: $5.3m
    Value Differential: +$4.4m

    4. Martellus Bennett, TE – Cap: $1.8m, PBV: $5.6m, Value Differential: +$3.8m

    5. Victor Cruz, WR – Cap: $540k, PBV: $3.8m, Value Differential: +$3.3m

    6. Ahmad Bradshaw, HB – Cap: $4.5m, PBV: $7.3m, Value Differential: +$2.8m

    7. Eli Manning, QB – Cap: $9.6m, PBV: $12.3m, Value Differential: +$2.7m

    8. Hakeem Nicks, WR – Cap: $1.8m, PBV: $4.4m, Value Differential: +$2.6m

    9. Stevie Brown, S – Cap: $610k, PBV: $2.8m, Value Differential: +$2.2m

    10. Domenik Hixon, WR – Cap: $660k, PBV: $2.5m, Value Differential: +$1.9m

    Overvalued

    1. Corey Webster, Cornerback

    In 2012, Webster was near the top of the leaderboard in some categories where you want to be at the bottom. His yards per catch allowed of 16.7 was fourth-most, and his eight touchdowns allowed was second for all cornerbacks. It doesn’t help that he had previously restructured his contract which led to a larger cap hit in 2012 and 2013.

    2012 Cap Hit: $9.3m
    2012 Performance Based Value: $1.1m
    Value Differential: -$8.3m

    2. Antrel Rolle, Safety

    Rolle is another Giants defensive back not earning his ridiculously high salary. He allowed a 72.7% catch rate, which was the fourth worst among safeties who were targeted at least 40 times. His 12 missed tackles don’t help him either. Although he at times is an asset in the run game, that isn’t nearly enough to make him worth $9 million.

    2012 Cap Hit: $9.0m
    2012 Performance Based Value: $1.1m
    Value Differential: -$8.0m

    3. Chris Canty, Defensive Tackle*

    In this case the Giants already decided Canty was overvalued and released him after the season. He is a good interior pass rusher with a Pass Rushing Productivity of 8.6, which was 10th-best at defensive/nose tackle. The problem is he missed half of the season, and even if he played in that time it would be hard for him to match his high cap hit.

    2012 Cap Hit: $8.0m
    2012 Performance Based Value: $2.9m
    Value Differential: -$5.1m

    4. Michael Boley, LB – Cap: $5.7m, PBV: $1.1m, Value Differential: -$4.6m

    5. Justin Tuck, DE – Cap: $5.4m, PBV: $1.1m, Value Differential: -$4.3m

    6. Osi Umenyiora, DE – Cap: $5.0m, PBV: $1.2m, Value Differential: -$3.8m

    7. Mathias Kiwanuka, OLB/DL – Cap: $4.6m, PBV: $830k, Value Differential: -$3.8m

    8. David Diehl, OL – Cap: $3.4m, PBV: $930k, Value Differential: -$2.5m

    9. David Baas, C – Cap: $3.4m, PBV: $2.1m, Value Differential: -$1.3m

    10. Chris Snee, G – Cap: $5.5m, PBV: $4.2m, Value Differential: -$1.3m

    Summary – Team Value Differential: -4.3m

    It would be hard to find another team that has so many undervalued offensive players, and so many overvalued defensive players. Three of the top six overvalued likely won’t be back with the Giants next year, and a lot of that money will probably be used to pay some of the undervalued offensive players to restore balance to the Giants.

    •  GOAT56 says:

      Damn I didn’t look up. Didn’t mean to repost

    •  shmitty013 says:

      Very much supports Krow’s thought that I agreed with: We pay too much for mediocrity.

      •  G-MenFan says:

        No, that’s where you’re wrong. We don’t pay too much for mediocrity. “We” pay top dollar to land the key guys we need and make a run. Then, we dump salary and start again. Reese is the master of this.

        The Giants were making a run last year and it fizzled. Now it’s dump city.

        Reese will get his pieces again.

  3.  GOAT56 says:

    I think Houston will be more expensive than in the 4 mil range. I’m all for it if that’s the price range. But he played well last year as a #1 CB and that seems more like over 6 mil per year. Which CB on the market has really played better than him and has no injury concerns the last few years? Pro football focus agrees

    https://www.profootballfocus.com/blog/2013/02/22/ranking-the-2013-free-agents-cornerbacks-2/

  4.  GOAT56 says:

    Performance Based Value: New York Giants

    In this series of pieces, Pro Football Focus is hammering into the value of players. To us it’s a “Performance Based Value” number, telling you what players were worth (by our grading) in 2012. You can read about the work we’ve done to create it here, but in short:

    • It’s solely about what a player did on the field in 2012
    • Players are grouped by positions so their play essentially earns them a portion of the positional salary pool
    • It’s all about cap hits (these values are approximate)

    Here are 2012?s most undervalued and overvalued New York Giants:

    (* Denotes player missed significant portion of time through injury)

    Undervalued

    1. William Beatty, Offensive Tackle

    It took a David Diehl injury for Beatty to crack the starting lineup in 2012, and luckily for the Giants it was a move that ended up helping the team. He allowed just three combined sacks/hits, which was second fewest for tackles with at least 200 pass-block snaps. His +10.9 run block rating was third-best among left tackles, which made him a double threat at the position. The Giants did a great job locking up Beatty for the long term just two days ago.

    2012 Cap Hit: $850k
    2012 Performance Based Value: $8.0m
    Value Differential: +$7.2m

    2. Jason Pierre-Paul, Defensive End

    Some might thing Pierre-Paul had a down year because his sack total was cut in half, but really JPP was still a great player. His dominance comes more in the run game where his Run Stop Percentage of 9.0 was second among 4-3 defensive ends. He had 55 total pressures, which was 15th-most, and still leaves him as a very good edge rusher — which is a position which typically makes a lot of money.

    2012 Cap Hit: $2.5m
    2012 Performance Based Value: $7.6m
    Value Differential: +$5.1m

    3. Linval Joseph, Defensive Tackle

    Linval Joseph is yet another very young Giants player that is playing much better than his rookie contract is worth. His 6.9 Run Stop Percentage and 6.3 Pass Rushing Productivity are both better than average at the position. He still has a ways to go to be among the very best at the position, but he has made a good start.

    2012 Cap Hit: $930k
    2012 Performance Based Value: $5.3m
    Value Differential: +$4.4m

    4. Martellus Bennett, TE – Cap: $1.8m, PBV: $5.6m, Value Differential: +$3.8m

    5. Victor Cruz, WR – Cap: $540k, PBV: $3.8m, Value Differential: +$3.3m

    6. Ahmad Bradshaw, HB – Cap: $4.5m, PBV: $7.3m, Value Differential: +$2.8m

    7. Eli Manning, QB – Cap: $9.6m, PBV: $12.3m, Value Differential: +$2.7m

    8. Hakeem Nicks, WR – Cap: $1.8m, PBV: $4.4m, Value Differential: +$2.6m

    9. Stevie Brown, S – Cap: $610k, PBV: $2.8m, Value Differential: +$2.2m

    10. Domenik Hixon, WR – Cap: $660k, PBV: $2.5m, Value Differential: +$1.9m

    Overvalued

    1. Corey Webster, Cornerback

    In 2012, Webster was near the top of the leaderboard in some categories where you want to be at the bottom. His yards per catch allowed of 16.7 was fourth-most, and his eight touchdowns allowed was second for all cornerbacks. It doesn’t help that he had previously restructured his contract which led to a larger cap hit in 2012 and 2013.

    2012 Cap Hit: $9.3m
    2012 Performance Based Value: $1.1m
    Value Differential: -$8.3m

    2. Antrel Rolle, Safety

    Rolle is another Giants defensive back not earning his ridiculously high salary. He allowed a 72.7% catch rate, which was the fourth worst among safeties who were targeted at least 40 times. His 12 missed tackles don’t help him either. Although he at times is an asset in the run game, that isn’t nearly enough to make him worth $9 million.

    2012 Cap Hit: $9.0m
    2012 Performance Based Value: $1.1m
    Value Differential: -$8.0m

    3. Chris Canty, Defensive Tackle*

    In this case the Giants already decided Canty was overvalued and released him after the season. He is a good interior pass rusher with a Pass Rushing Productivity of 8.6, which was 10th-best at defensive/nose tackle. The problem is he missed half of the season, and even if he played in that time it would be hard for him to match his high cap hit.

    2012 Cap Hit: $8.0m
    2012 Performance Based Value: $2.9m
    Value Differential: -$5.1m

    4. Michael Boley, LB – Cap: $5.7m, PBV: $1.1m, Value Differential: -$4.6m

    5. Justin Tuck, DE – Cap: $5.4m, PBV: $1.1m, Value Differential: -$4.3m

    6. Osi Umenyiora, DE – Cap: $5.0m, PBV: $1.2m, Value Differential: -$3.8m

    7. Mathias Kiwanuka, OLB/DL – Cap: $4.6m, PBV: $830k, Value Differential: -$3.8m

    8. David Diehl, OL – Cap: $3.4m, PBV: $930k, Value Differential: -$2.5m

    9. David Baas, C – Cap: $3.4m, PBV: $2.1m, Value Differential: -$1.3m

    10. Chris Snee, G – Cap: $5.5m, PBV: $4.2m, Value Differential: -$1.3m

    Summary – Team Value Differential: -4.3m

    It would be hard to find another team that has so many undervalued offensive players, and so many overvalued defensive players. Three of the top six overvalued likely won’t be back with the Giants next year, and a lot of that money will probably be used to pay some of the undervalued offensive players to restore balance to the Giants.

    https://www.profootballfocus.com/blog/2013/03/01/performance-based-value-new-york-giants/

  5.  GOAT56 says:

    I pretty much agree with the PFF analysis except Rolle and Bradshaw. I think they really have to separate what Rolle has allowed as a true safety and a nickel CB. Bradshaw I don’t feel like he’s being penalized for missing holes and just not having the speed to make bigger plays on some 10-20 yard runs that another RB like Wilson could have made. Bradshaw was worth his 2012 cap hit but I don’t think he was undervalued.

    It’s also interesting that Cruz was valued at only 3.8 mil for his production last year while even a banged up Nicks was valued at 4.4 mil.

  6.  Krow says:

    Guys c’mon … if Pro Football Focus was named Joe, Pete, and Harry’s Football Web Site I think you’d have a much different opinion of their … opinions.

    If Performance Based Value was called Joe, Pete, and Harry’s Opinion of Who Performed Good and Bad … then it might be more truthful.

    If ‘solely what a player did on the field’ was described as ‘solely what Joe, Pete, and Harry thought a player did on the field’ … ummmm, you get my drift? Right?

    •  GOAT56 says:

      I have seen numerous places use PFF as a source including espn. It’s not a random football site. It might not be 100% or even 50% right but it has merit. No it’s not the same as a scout but it’s like a more detailed box score because the people the keep a box score are not scouts either. Yes, they dervived their stats by hand but that wasn’t done to come up with a certain view point. Articles like this are actually purely number driven. Numbers in any realm of football have an human element in how they were gathered.

      •  Krow says:

        The measure stuff … a lot of it is subjective … and then they say the stuff they measure is an indicator of performance. There’s absolutely no verification of that claim.

  7. PFF, contrart to belief is not exactly Joe, Pete, and Harry. I applied for a position writing there and got into the final round before I tapped out from the workload.

    You have to watch every game and log exact personnel on the field at all times, their assignment, their alignment, and the result via a spreadsheet. You dont have to be a professional scout. But you do have to go through an extremely rigorous process.

    Lets face it, a pro scout is just a guy who has a relative in an NFL front office. These guys are not as smart as we make them out to be. Someone took Jamarcus Russell first overall.

    •  Krow says:

      Right … so Victor Cruz delivered less value than Hakeem Nicks last year. And Bradshaw was almost more valuable than the both of the put together.

      Nothing wrong there …

      • It was an intriguing opinion based on salary thats all. I dont there were any other real implications. Fact is, nobody is iron-clad in this business, but at least they can claim they watch every play. Unlike most people at espn, pft, nfln, who just see highlights.

        •  Krow says:

          And I’m sure they do a diligent job. But when they start deriving conclusions … and come up with garbage like Bradshaw out playing both Cruz and Nicks … then you have to figure they’re not measuring what they say they are.

          What they do is interesting and fun … but when they start telling us who is better that’s when it breaks down … just like here. It’s ridiculous.

          •  GOAT56 says:

            So it’s crazy to think Bradshaw had a better year than Cruz and Nicks last year? I’m not talking about who’s a better player but look at the years they had and what they provided compared to others at their positions on other teams. I’m not saying I agree but the claim isn’t crazy like you make it seem. Much like I have argued Beatty played better than Cruz last year. Take a step back and really look at it. You still will argue their stat conclusions but I think you will see that they bring some different view points that have some real validity.

      •  GOAT56 says:

        Isn’t the argument we have been making for Nicks over Cruz for his presence. They could have stats that measure that aspect. I don’t think it’s a crazy argument at all. Because many of us have argued that when team realized Nicks really wasn’t Nicks, Cruz became ineffective. They might measure how many players covered him or something of that nature. As Kyle said its not the one plus one you are making it out to be.

        Beatty’s 2012 Player value salary seems to be right about the number he got from us per year.

        I think you are looking at their stats like they have to be wrong rather than what if they are right and from what you have seen how could that be true. When I view their stats from that viewpoint I have some minor quibbles but their stats seem very logical.

        •  Krow says:

          Cruz … 86 catches … 1092 yards … 10 TDs
          Nicks .. 53 catches ….. 692yards …. 3 TDs

          WTF are they measuring that puts Nicks over Cruz? And how is Bradshaw … a guy so good we cut him over $4 million dollars … almost better than both these guys combined?

          PFF is like a religion … facts don’t matter … and it’s impervious to common sense.

          •  shmitty013 says:

            I figured you’d enjoy those numbers because they pretty much support your claim that we pay for mediocrity.

            •  Krow says:

              I actually like what PFF does. Just not when they act as if it’s some sort of settled fact. Or that they’ve discovered the formula.

              And for sure we don’t get out monies worth on a lot of those guys.

              •  G-MenFan says:

                In the meantime, who’s still here and who’s not? Who is having their contract negotiated right now and who’s waiting in line?

                You have to admit–like it or not–their “grades” seem to be mirrored by the behavior of our GM.

          •  GOAT56 says:

            It’s just like a QB rating when Alex Smith throws for 100 yards but has a much better rating than Carson Palmer who has much more yards and TDs. Come on don’t give a simplistic answer like that because it’s not that simple. Otherwise give me Romo over Eli right?

            Because Bradshaw’s impact can be bettered by Wilson and Brown. please stop with the simple analysis. I can go anyplace for that chatter.

  8.  GmenMania says:

    Houston will mot likely not be a bargain in free agency. First off, the Lions desperately want to sign him, and secondly, there are a lot of cornerback-needy teams out there and this is a relatively weak FA CB class.

    Also, there’s no way we get the full 9 million in cap space if we cut Webster. His base salary is only something like 7 million, so that’s the most we would get. Plus, if we cut Webster, that cap relief would most likely be used to re-sign or extend some of our own players, and that CB void would be filled either through a bargain bin FA or a high-middle round draft pick.

    • Anthony Raiaaxr29 says:

      Good. Let the cornerback hungry teams over pay guys in FA and let Xavier Rhodes fall into our lap.

    •  Krow says:

      I’ll take that $7,000,000 …

      •  KingAndrewXXIII says:

        Agree with both of these last 2 statements; give me Rhodes and the 7M. I still think there will be guys out there in FA/cut by their current team that are just as good, if not better than Webster who will come with a smaller price tag…which we could then use the excess money to go after the Unicorn and make KP a more reasonable offer.

        I am a little on the fence about Boothe. I think he is a “good, not great” player who is looking to cash in. His versatility and ability to play center certainly adds to his value, but I’m not sure we couldn’t get equal/more production out of a 2-4th rounder in a draft that is stocked with talent at the OL position. If we can get him back on a reasonable deal…then I’m all for it…but anything over 2.5M/season I don’t really view as being worth it.

  9.  Dirt says:

    Well, Ray Lewis killed two guys, Pacman Jones is known for making it rain, etc. You think one of these lowlife thugs would love to knock out a woman oin the field? Think a (Hall of Famer) Warren Sapp wouldn’t think twice about jacking her up and yell “you thought you was tough and put a jersey on, you ain’t so tough now!”?

    No one would hesitate to hit her. Nor should they. Nor should she want it any other way.

    Good for her for getting a tryout. I’m pulling for her, just as much as I’m pulling for all the other candidates. She should absolutely be there if she has the skills to merit her invitation.

    •  G-MenFan says:

      Couldn’t disagree more.

      She’s a woman. You have locker room issues, unity issues, “eating where you ***” issues, etc.

      It’s a bad idea IMO and it’s a 55-gallon drum of liquid steaming **** waiting to spill.

      And I wouldn’t want to be anywhere near that.

  10.  Krow says:

    I think Kevin Boothe is not going to get any big offers. I like the guy … good character … works hard … but he’s ‘a guy’. He may be able to wrangle a little package for his long years of service … but not much. $1.5-2 …ish … per year.

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