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For New York Giants, Solid Foundation Makes “Dynasty” Talk a Potential Reality

July 27th, 2012 at 1:29 PM
By Jen Polashock

There’s more dialog of how “it’s so hard to repeat” as NFL World Champions than there is of why this type of talk isn’t delusional drivel. If one thinks about it, it’s hard for any team to win a Super Bowl. The odds just increase when the word “repeat” is added. The New York Giants know and believe that what has been built upon for the last several years is enough to back their confident statements.

Quite a few explanations can argue in favor of a championship recurrence. The Giants organization would prefer to deem it more as something better – something they started preparing for once the celebrations ended back in February. The components that make reality out of what pundits scoff at haven’t been altered.

General Manager Jerry Reese has never stopped building upon his mission statement. During his introduction as “absolutely the appropriate person to be the general manager of the New York Football Giants”, Reese proclaimed that he had “hotspots” that he (and his personnel staff) would evaluate and spoke of adding and deleting guys in the process. He still continues this philosophy as well as his goal: To help build the team to win championships.

Head Coach Tom Coughlin is an old-school football mind. His heart is in everything he does. He cares about what he does and how he does it – and pays close attention to details in the process. Football fundamentals are his basic coaching style and he lets his coordinators take those fundamentals to the next level – as dictated by how the times have changed the game. He continues to have the entire team playing together as one under him and buying into his rudimentary ways.

Quarterback Eli Manning has only grown each season since he first put on a blue #10 Giants jersey over dark grey suit in front of rabid fans at Giants Stadium on that sunny draft day: April 24, 2004. Easy-E has had his share of critics (and continues to), but his demeanor is to crack a joke about it and leave it behind. Some can say he’s got the short-term memory of a cornerback. In doing so, he’s proven to his teammates that this is his team, he is that captain of the offense and if need be, he’ll put it on his back in true MVP fashion and not think twice about it. It’s never about him – unless it’s about improving.

The Defensive Unit as a working whole has shown that in their threatening attack is more than one single leader. DE Justin Tuck wears the defensive “C”, but when he was weakened by injuries, others stepped up and, without stepping on #91’s toes, took charge and led the unit and held them to be accountable. As changes and injuries continue to poke at this bunch, the focus always comes back in the form of a powerfully reminding pre-game speech – from someone yelling about what needs to be done (then it gets done on the field). This core is the most All In.

The Team Factor is one that remains underestimated. Back in 2006, the team believed that it was more than destined to win it all and started a “Ballin” refrain before the basic teamwork nucleus was built. Players were celebrating before anything real was achieved and “Team Always” was just about forgotten. That changed in 2007 and every player was there for the guy next to him – that’s only gotten stronger since. Recently, Dallas Cowboys LB DeMarcus Ware referred to the New York Giants “team”:

“I really don’t like to talk about the Giants, but their team camaraderie, where they had the adversity right at the beginning, and then all of a sudden, it really kicked in,” Ware said. “The last maybe eight games, the blood sweat and tears really kicked in, the guys started feeling it and they had that swagger about themselves. It’s not on the coaches at all, it’s all about the players,” Ware said. “It’s just being there for the man beside you.”

Lastly, The Mara/Tisch Connection to the team is not like that of their familial predecessors, but similar. They continue to represent a solid organization with firm ideals, values and tradition that hasn’t wavered. At times, they too let their Giants Pride show through and it even whispers a hint of credence that everything that’s transpired since that magical ’07 season is leading up to not only R-E-P-E-A-T, but Dynasty.

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Tags: DeMarcus Ware, Eli Manning, Football, Jerry Reese, Justin Tuck, New York, New York Giants, NFL, Tom Coughlin

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28 Responses to “For New York Giants, Solid Foundation Makes “Dynasty” Talk a Potential Reality”

  1.  Chad Eldred says:

    NOOOOOOO, not the “D” word. We are underdogs. Overlooked and under appreciated. Nothing more.

  2.  GOAT56 says:

    Repost:

    I think it’s both the injuries and incosistent effort. I think the injuries definitely played a factor but I thought 3 games were poor effort especially on the first half. Those games were Sea, Phi#2 and Was#2. I think people are being too quick to discredit a full healthy Was#1 vs our banged up team in week 1, that wasn’t a bad effort at all. I think injuries were the main factor for Was#1, Stl (I know we won but I thought we didn’t play well) and NO (the margin) were games I felt the injuries were taken a toll.

    •  GOAT56 says:

      If we repeat we are a dynasty. People will argue that fact but 3 SBs in 6 years and 12-4, 8-8 and 10-6 records for non SB years is pretty strong. No it’s not the convential dynasty but it meets mordern day standards.

      •  rlhjr says:

        I agree with you GOAT. However, there will be no more “typical” dynasty in this era of free agency, injury and rule changes that open up the passing game and restrict defense. A dynasty now would be 3 in 6 years or 4 in 8. But there would most likely be no repeats. The championships will be scattered about.

  3.  norm says:

    Well, I’m not going to attempt to argue that the Giants bring their “A Game” 100% of the time.

    That simply would not be true.

    But then again, show me the alternative – the NFL team who exemplifies consistent effort week in and week out over the full course of a 16-game season.

    That team does not exist, either.

    Look, it’s the easiest thing in the world to sit in the comfort of our own living rooms and attribute poor performance to such “intangibles” as “lack of effort” or (my personal favorite) “the other team wanted it more.” It all sounds good – but it’s also so much BS. And BS it will remain until such day that we are able to see inside the minds of the players.

    I’ve never been a fan of divining the psychological factors behind poor performance. Which is not to say that those factors don’t play a part. It’s just that they are largely unknowable to us fans. Why attribute a loss to something based on our own conjecture rather than on something that is more easily verifiable. Injuries, for instance.

    A lot of those so-called “no show” games featured a Justin Tuck who was rendered largely invisible due to, yep, nagging injuries. To the uninformed observer, Tuck’s play could just as easily been attributed to “inconsistent effort.” Which is not to say that Tuck should be held blameless. But if he is to be blamed for anything, it’s for taking the field knowing that he could not play anywhere near 100% of capacity.

    Think about that stat I cited earlier. Over the first 14 games of 2011, the Giants D went into every game missing an average of four starters or key reserves due to injury. That’s more than 1/3 of the lineup and represents the third highest number of key players lost by any NFL team since the year 2000. Call me delusional, but I think that stat goes a lot further to explain the 7-7 start than the far more nebulous “lack of consistent effort.”

    •  Dirt says:

      I’ll take this one step further: you don’t know who’s injured all the time. We just found out Landfill played on 1 foot. You might have said he was playing inconsistently. He was injured.

  4.  Nosh.0 says:

    Norm-
    I’m gonna disagree with you on the consistency thing. We’ll save a Drew Brees argument for a later date.

    The TC/Eli Giants have always managed to lose games in which they had no business losing. Last years games include Vince Young Philly game at home. Seahawks game at home. Which by the way should not be blamed on Cruz.

    The Giants should have put Seattle away long before that point. It should have never came down to a last second drive to tie the game. Seattle isn’t in our league.

    And the second Skins game. Again at home. Those don’t include letting a dead Dolphins team breathe some life into the 4th Q, or letting a much inferior Arizona team almost beat you.

    In contrast the Patriots have won 13, 14, 10, 11, 16, and 12 games respectively the last 6 seasons.

    The Saints under Drew Brees have won 13, 11, 13, the past 3 seasons.

    Thew Colts under Peyton won 10, 14, 12, 13, 12, 14, 12, from 2010-2004.

    The Steelers under Big Ben have won 12, 12, 9, 12, 10, the last 5 seasons.

    Eli and TC have won 9, 10, 8, the past 3 seasons. That is simply unacceptable for a QB/ coach combo that many consider one of the best in the league, if not the best.

    Eli is clearly a top 3-5 QB, but I’m not ready to put Coughlin in that class. Not when he’s underachieved with so many teams. With Eli under center we should be winning a minimum of 10 games a season and making the playoffs every year.

    Injuries sminjuries! Our QB hasn’t missed a game. Ever! The injury excuse can be used somewhere else. As long as #10 is suiting up every game we should be making the playoffs every year. Thats on TC.

    If we indeed have a top 3 QB, a Top 3 Coach, and a top 3 GM. Then we should be winning the amount of Reg season games those other teams are winning every year.

    •  GOAT56 says:

      I see your point and logically you’re right. But I do feel that we have had our unfair share of injuries and extremely difficult schedules. The reason for the big difference is we don’t defend our home turf as well as we should. I think that’s part the team and part the fans. I don’t think the fans bring it like they should for games against the teams we should beat. If the team struggles early the fans are quick to boo or get restless. It seems that neither the team nor fans handle the favorite role well.

      Considering all of that we still won 10,12,8,10,9 games the last 5 years. If you expand NO you will see an 8-8 and 9 or 10 win season as well. Peyton and Brady have been this generation’s best for their consistency. I don’t think it’s any shame to not be as good. We have been similar to the Steelers who are really our twin in how we run things so I don’t see the issue with them being a little better.

      However, with all this regular season talk you can’t forget “you play to win the game” and we have won “the game” twice in the past 5 years. So all the regular season wins and consistency is nice and all but it’s all about the SB wins in the end. Of course our 86′ SB winning model is great but let’s not get the goal confused. I bet Pitt, NE, Indy and NO fans would all trade places with us the past 5 years. Look at the Miami Heat, they finished 2nd in the east and 4th in the NBA but won a chip. No one really cares. Yes, we all want the icing (regular season wins) on top too but the most important part is the cake (SB wins).

      •  Nosh.0 says:

        Yes as for the Super Bowl I got no beef there. If I have a choice between an inconsistent 9-7 with a ring or 14-2 with no ring, I’ll take 9-7 every single time.

        I just think that if we’re going to put TC in the same class as Bellicheck (I don’t think he is), and Eli in the same class as Brady, Brees, Rodgers and Peyton, (I believe he belongs), then they have to start playing better in the regular season.

        To be clear, this never really bothered me until 2010. A year we had a legit shot to make a run at a SB and I had to watch Coughlin completely blow that week 15 Philly game and Jason Garrett’s first game as Dallas’ HC. Then listen to him go on some rant about how winning 10 games and missing the playoffs is something to be proud of.

        I mean the Ravens won 12 games the last 2 years. With freaking Joe Flacco!

        If Eli plays every game this year TC has no excuse not to be in the tournament. I really don’t care how hard the schedule is.

        People get so bent out of shape on here when “experts” pick us to win 9 games or don’t pick us to win the division. I assume that’s because they believe us to be a top 5 team, as I do. Well top 5 teams go to the playoffs every year.

        If Eli plays all 16 and we miss the tournament again, that will make 3 times in the past 4 years. And I’ll be driving the fire TC bus. With a banner of course thanking him for the 2 SB rings. Especially the 07 one. (Not saying last year wasn’t great, but there was something truly special about beating Dallas in their own building, especially that cocky Dallas team.)

        •  GOAT56 says:

          I think you are confusing 2 things at least from my view. Most that say TC is as good or better than Bellicheck or say Eli is as good or better than Brady, Peyton, Brees, Rodgers, etc. are talking about right now. Career wise Eli doesn’t match Brady or Peyton. Just as TC doesn’t match Bellicheck. Maybe one day they can but not yet.

          I think you are giving Brees and Rodgers too much advanced credit. Brees career wise I bet doesn’t have any better win % than Eli. While Rodgers has done it for only 4 years. Pitt has even shown they can win without Big Ben.

          Yes, we have blown some games and had some inexcuseable performances. But that pales in comparison to the great wins we have had under TC and Eli. I know sometimes the losses like Philly 2010 or SF 2001 playoffs you never quite get over. But the wins you don’t forget either. I mean last year was so crazy that we almost forget the greats wins vs NE, Philly, Dallas twice, ATl and the Jets. The last 3 wins were so great it almost wipes those.

          You’re wilding on the fire TC if we have a non playoff year! Wilding! You have lost focus on what the end result is and getting caught up in things that don’t matter. It seems that you don’t care about SBs much and want to be regular season champs. Not me I understand SB is by far the most important thing. Look at the great bills teams. Or those great Colt teams. History will forget them a lot faster than this era of Giant football.

    •  Dirt says:

      I will agree with a ton of this. Top 3 coach + QB should win 10+ all the time, no doubt. The Giants team was also better than most of those teams over a lot of the recent past.

      But I will throw this in there: The AFC is garbage and has been on a downward slide for some time. The Colts had been feeding off Houston, Jax & Tenn 6x per year. Patriots in a horrible AFC East. Steelers on the embarassment of Ohio.

      The Eagles have been one of the winningest teams in football. The Cowboys always competing. And all the QBs are in the NFC, save 2-3.

  5.  Chad Eldred says:

    Looking at it objectively (or at least trying to) there is some historical data to justify the inconsistency talk.

    2004 After a 5-2 start they drop the next 8 games, 9 of their last 10 to finish 8-8.

    2005 Most consistent year. Never had a streak of more than one loss.

    2006 After a 6-2 start they lost 4 in a row, 7 of last 10 to finish 7-9.

    2007 Consistent once again. Drop first 2, but finish 10-6, pretty even ride.

    2008 After an 11-1 start they lose 3 of their last 4 and exit to Philly in playoffs.

    2009 After a 5-0 start they lose 4 in a row, 8 of their last 11, finish 8-8.

    2010 Finish 10-6, but 3 mini-two game losing streaks account for 6 losses.

    2011 After 6-2 start they lose 5 of next 6. Win last 2 to get in playoffs.

    My intent to cast Coughlin disparaging light at all. Please don’t try to paint me in that corner. I’m simply pointing out that in ’04, ’06. ’08, ’09, and ’11 there were some significant periods of turbulence. Maybe every team goes through this. I don’t have the familiarity or desire to research every other team in the league. Not sure of the reasons either, but there must be more involved than Justin Tuck’s nagging injuries.

    •  Chad Eldred says:

      *”My intent IS NOT to cast Coughlin in a disparaging light at all.”

      •  GOAT56 says:

        This is when looking at stats can be faulty without looking at the whole picture. While all of that is 100% correct without looking at opponets win % in those splits it doesn’t tell the whole story. It seems that for whatever reason we end up with more difficult 2nd half schedules. The last 4 years I definitely know that was the case and if you look at our 2012 schedule it looks to be the case again. I also wish for each game we had that average starters missing stat that we have for 2011. However, some of it is Eli has not played as well especially earlier in his career in Nov and Dec. It’s a question that has a more complex answer than the raw win loss numbers display.

    •  Eric S says:

      Giants finished 8-8 in 2006. Eli has never had a losing season as the full time starter

  6.  JimStoll says:

    looks like TT has a back issue and is out of practice
    Barden is having his perenial good first practice
    Wilson seems to have made a nice catch

  7.  Chad Eldred says:

    I can tolerate inconsistency as long as we win a super bowl every couple years. It just means that I’ll be on blood pressure medication, which is relatively cheap.

  8.  norm says:

    OK… a few points:

    1) I’m not seeking to reduce things down to the single factor of injuries. My primary intent here was to encourage people to look beyond the pat and ultimately meaningless (because it can’t be properly measured) explanation of “lack of consistent effort.” Which is not to say that that is not a factor either. I just think it does less to adequately explain the first 14 games of 2011 than the historically heavy rash of injuries to the defense.

    2) As to Nosh’s point that any team with Eli should routinely win 10+ games a year, I’d say that Eli could have done little to address the real reason behind the 7-7 start last season: a piss-poor defense. That defense was the reason why the likes of Tavaris Jackson, Charlie Whitehurst, Vince Young, and Rex Grossman were able to march up and down the field on the Giants last year.

    3) Does anyone seriously want to argue that “lack of consistent effort” was the primary reason for the D’s failing last year? The D just sucked for much of the year, plain and simple. Injuries were certainly a part of that; a scheme that was a poor fit may also have had something to do with it. But lack of effort? Even if players like Greg Jones gave 200% effort, he still would have sucked. As would many of the lesser lights that were routinely being shuttled in and out of the lineup last year.

    4) Along similar lines, I’m sure a much better explanation than “lack of consistent effort” can be found to deconstruct the much ballyhooed Coughlin 2nd half collapses referenced by Chad. I have neither the time nor inclination to undertake such a project. Instead, I’ll continue to stand by my earlier assertion that “lack of consistent effort” is just too lazy of a hypothesis to be of any real use in understanding the outcome of a particular game or season.

    •  JimStoll says:

      not sure I buy that, Norm.
      of course there were key injuries all through last season. Losing Goff and TT before the season startd. No Osi and no Healthy Tuck together until the last game of the regular season. Baas.

      But they played some terrific games despite that. The first Philly game; the NE game. The SF game. The GB game. to name 4.
      But then there were those stinkers.

      •  norm says:

        Hmmm… who’s to say that the fans in Philly, NE, SF, and GB are not citing their respective team’s “lack of consistent effort” as an explanation for their performance against the Giants in those games?

        That’s the wonderful thing about using a meaningless, utterly subjective reason to explain objective reality – they’re freely available for use by anyone.

  9.  Nosh.0 says:

    Repost:

    If I have a choice between an inconsistent 9-7 with a ring or 14-2 with no ring, I’ll take 9-7 every single time.

    I just think that if we’re going to put TC in the same class as Bellicheck (I don’t think he is), and Eli in the same class as Brady, Brees, Rodgers and Peyton, (I believe he belongs), then they have to start playing better in the regular season.

    To be clear, this never really bothered me until 2010. A year we had a legit shot to make a run at a SB and I had to watch Coughlin completely blow that week 15 Philly game and Jason Garrett’s first game as Dallas’ HC. Then listen to him go on some rant about how winning 10 games and missing the playoffs is something to be proud of.

    I mean the Ravens won 12 games the last 2 years. With freaking Joe Flacco!

    If Eli plays every game this year TC has no excuse not to be in the tournament. I really don’t care how hard the schedule is.

    People get so bent out of shape on here when “experts” pick us to win 9 games or don’t pick us to win the division. I assume that’s because they believe us to be a top 5 team, as I do. Well top 5 teams go to the playoffs every year.

    If Eli plays all 16 and we miss the tournament again, that will make 3 times in the past 4 years. And I’ll be driving the fire TC bus. With a banner of course thanking him for the 2 SB rings. Especially the 07 one. (Not saying last year wasn’t great, but there was something truly special about beating Dallas in their own building, especially that cocky 2007 Dallas team.)

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